Re.engineer Magazine - Winter 2022

HBCU

Non-profit, Bridging Structural Holes Recreates Iconic Scene HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITY (HBCU) ALUMNI POSE FOR HISTORIC PHOTO SHOOT

BRIDGING STRUCTURAL HOLES

Connecting the Gaps We produce social business

The Structural Holes that created inequality within the workplace, housing, education and healthcare have been replaced with bridges of hope, achievement and opportunity. Sidewalk grids are no longer used as a resting place for a displaced human body. Racism, separatism and inequality have been replaced by a new world vision of hope, solutions and opportunities for all. doors that connect them with opportunities to change their trajectory in life. Find a Hole; build a Bridge...create solutions. Vision inaccessibility for higher education, employment, housing and healthcare all have their genesis rooted in the Structural Holes that exist in our society today. Bridging these Structural Holes are the challenge that we as a New York based non-profit have decided to embrace. Creating these Bridges and connecting the gaps will enable those socially and economically disadvantaged groups to open new programs, initiatives and strategies that connect people with powerful life altering narratives. Our story begins and ends with people. Structural Holes are the gaps that exist between people, groups, opportunities and communities in a society. These gaps are results that have been created and worsened by the economic inequality that exists in many communities throughout the world. The infrastructure and

HARLEM, NEW YORK – On September 25, 2021, a historic gathering of HBCU alumni took place on the quiet steps beneath the campus of Columbia University. Bridging Structural Holes, a nonprofit organization based in Harlem, kicked off its 2nd annual Harlem Renaissance Classic (HRC), inside Morningside Park in Harlem. The occasion marked the re-creation of a photograph that was taken in 1958 by 57 black jazz musicians outside in front of a Harlem brownstone. It was a sign of unity during a time when Black entertainers were disrespected in America.

As the HBCU alumni arrived for the morning photoshoot, they began reminiscing and taking their own personal photos and videos of the iconic event on mobile devices. The participants wore their alma mater colors which represented 185 years of unapologetic struggles to attain academic excellence through attending HBCUs.

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